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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there is no doubt we have to bring down medicare health-care cost growth. the difference is that we believe we should expand on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, where we achieved billion about $716 billion in savings, not simply by across the board provider cuts, but by changing the incentive structure, the way we pay providers so we focus on the value of care, not the volume of care. i think it is ironic that we have gone in the last four weeks from many of our republican colleagues criticizing the president for having done too much in savings on medicare, $716 billion -- their presidential candidate proposed putting that money back in, in other words adding $716 billion back into the cost of medicare, to complaining the president does not want to do enough. >> who was that presidential candidate? anyone remember? >> i do not want to relitigate the campaign, but it is an important point, i think, which is he proposed that we put the $716 billion net cost back into medicare, which would have shorten the life of the trust fund by eight years. now, the president's bud
in an unstable home environment. they grew up in dangerous neighborhoods with no access to healthcare. single parents and sometimes an elderly grandmother. they may not have a chance to participate in afterschool are working and cannot pick them up. every day some amazing parent or caretaker is of her, and all of it to give these kids a chance at a better life. consistently found that children struggle in comparison than children raised in more stable family settings. they face a higher risk ofhave lower scores on standardized tests, lower grades, and a much higher chance of dropping out of high school or failing to attend college. this societal breakdown is not something the government has solved, but it is something they cannot ignore. you cannot separate economic well-being of of your people from their social well-being. do is limited, but it is important. rather than pretend we know the answer, we should do as paul ryan suggests by engaging in mentoring young people and leading them onto the right path -- their teachers, coaches, priests, pastors. conversation in trading a social success.
in the u.s. health-care industry. what hospitals will not tell you. his latest is "unaccountable." >> every year, the jack kemp foundation recognizes people who live shown exceptional leadership in advancing the american idea. next, we hear from congressman bob ryan. he is the formal vice-president -- former vice presidential nominee and the two dozen 11 recipient of the award. >> good evening. i have the distinct pleasure of introducing our keynote speaker. i am the president of the center for enterprise. and a jack kemp groupie. [laughter] jack kemp worked with me for five years to help residents in public housing. there was a conference. bill observed, when liberals see poor people, they see a sea of victims. conservatives see poor people and see a sea of aliens. jack kemp and paul ryan are the exceptions. [applause] toward the end of the campaign, paul's staff called me and said, paul really wants to talk out on an anti-poverty agenda. could you organize an event in no haohio that would bring the leaders from around the state who have experience transforming not only lives but also revi
people and not bureaucracies. people should be able to buy a healthcare plan that fits their needs and their budgets from any insurance company in america that is willing to sell it to them. issue be able to do it with tax- free money, just like their employers by it now. [applause] we should also expand the number of community health centers and the best way to integrate them with emergency rims to try to get non-life-threatening walk- ins. these are a few of the things we can do at the federal level to create the conditions for middle-class job creators and stabilizing growth and the cost of living. no matter many middle-class jobs are created, we cannot growth the middle class if people do not have the skills to get hired for these jobs. not so long ago, even if you do not graduate from high school, if you are willing to work you are able to find a job that paid enough for a home and eventually send your kids off to college for a better life. that those days are long gone. they're probably not coming back. today education plays a central role in the 21st century economy. for exa
health care package. if i get sick, i am unfettered in terms of my health-care consumption. it will make it more costly and i will start shopping for health care. that will create more transparency and get the growth in health-care costs down. we do not know what is going to work, but there are some interesting new programs that have potential. we should see how those worked out before we engage in some very significant structural changes. like a voucher program. we may have to go down that path, but it is much too premature to do that. we should see how these developments work. >> following up, "if temporarily going over the cliff is necessary to achieving a good agreement, lawmakers should not hesitate to do so." how long do think we could stay over the cliff without doing significant damage to the economy? >> i think you could go into early february. by early february, it looks like you are not coming to a deal and investors began to discount the likelihood you're not coming to a deal, you will see stock prices decline, the bond market reacted. in fact consumer business, and would beg
the job engine in the economy, how dc healthcare policy factoring into that pushed mark -- how do you see healthcare policy factoring into that question mark -- into that? >> we have seen dramatic declines in small companies that offer health insurance to employees. that means that small companies are dropping coverage. what we have seen is companies sort of organizing themselves around the idea of an track in employees who do not recover -- of attracting employees who do not need coverage. there is a -- you are looking for a particular kind of person. you are looking for a part-time person. in that sense, it is a problem. if you go forward with health insurance changes over the next two or three years, it is not clear how that will shake out. there is a chain of what employers have to do with 15 employees -- 15 employees and more. in terms of the labor market distortion, they should remove the situation. ideally, everyone would have coverage and they're not going have to cater their hiring practices around the. on the other hand, it is a real cliff effect for many companies. the companie
recovery. 40% of the long-term growth in federal health programs is due to rising health-care costs, generally. 40%. 60% is due to americans aging. in fact, each and every day, and 10,000 americans turn 65. every day. 10,000 americans enter medicare. as chairman of the finance committee, i can influence a lot of policies, but i cannot keep folks from getting older. we need to focus on what we can influence, and that is over all health care cost. shifting cost to seniors is not the solution. we cannot break the promise of medicare and social security. that is a bedrock. we cannot break that promise. i was proud to how crafty affordable care act and we took major steps to slow the growth of health-care spending and strengthen medicare and medicaid, but there is still more to do. we need to focus on facts. if you turn on any television during the campaign season you saw attack ads claiming billions of cuts to medicare, putting seniors at risk. nothing could be further from the truth. there were zero cuts to medicare beneficiaries in the affordable care act. these ads are the types of m
the leadership to embrace it. we have to get some certainty into the health-care system. we are asking providers and doctors and hospitals to move in a different direction to embrace coordinated care and regis their costs in the right way. they cannot have the threats -- coordinated care and reduce their costs in the right way. they cannot have the threat of reductions hanging over their heads. >> you say you are optimistic there will be some kind of agreement. >> i said we should have an agreement and i believe we will have an agreement. i guess that is optimistic. the moment we have that common ground, we should. >> what else do you think might get to the president's desk? comprehensive immigration reform? could that make it through both chambers? >> let's do comprehensive tax reform, forward and individual. we should deal with theftr -- the ftr. should do comprehensive immigration reform. we can punish some people while they are helping other people. >> you are concerned about the health care law and health care in general. how is this going to play out with republicans say it's moving in dif
and medicaid and health-care spending, we start on medicare in making sure that we are committed to medicare. it is a promise we have made to seniors, current and future, even 54-year-old's and 44-year- old's and 34-year-old's. it is something we start with that promise to keep it universal and to keep benefits. once we decide that we will not ship cost to individuals, we have to focus on containing the rate of growth and costs in health care. medicare is a great way to do that. it affects the entire system for from private companies and individuals. we are trying to do that. implementing the aca is important in terms of delivery reforms. it pays doctors differently. it rewards quality. we should do that sooner than later. save those dollars sooner. in those discussions, are there other ways that we can see revenues come in from within the health-care system? that is on the table. i am not keen on increasing the age on medicare. we have gone through a really big debate about finding a way to have all americans have health insurance. that is taking a group of americans and figure out how they
. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014 and d
, but when you need it, you can not produce it overnight. the drivers of the dead are health-care -- not social security -- of the debt our health care -- not social security so much. we should send out a framework where negotiations could begin because the program will go broke. people drop out of the programs more than they put in. the average couple will spend $119,000 and draw out $340,000. that population is exploding as baby boomers retire. host: on the defense cuts to come under sequestration, does the gop proposal address that? guest: yes, it does. sequestration is not a good deal, this is something both sides think it is not a smart way to cut. is just -- sides think. it is not a smart way to cut. it is just across the board. it is heavy-handed and it is on top of half of $1 trillion in defense cuts and we have already made and you will lose another 100,000 people in your army that is already dropping. you cannot sustain defense. nothing is more expensive than war. war in the middle east triples the price of oil over night is important to discourage an attack -- overnight
: that was an additional surtax. it was a way to pay for parts of the healthcare law. they will see the top rates a bump of 3.8% come january 1. that seems unlikely to be changed as part of the fiscal cliff negotiations. you'll still see that surtax on top of that. host: this from twitter. guest: i leave that as it is. host: is that how much it could go up? guest: yes. host: currently it is 35%. go ahead, mark. caller: the previous caller mentioned capital gains -- the recent point about the medicare surcharge to pay for the affordable care act. if he thought it could be a solution to kill both of those birds with one stone. guest: i'm not a health-care expert. host: no problem. we have this from twitter. guest: i believe that is the case. tom in california, go ahead. caller: i have several issues with the estate tax. i am a farmer if it comes back to the normal 1 million exemptions. we work together to build this estate. it wasn't just my parents but it is in my parents' name. i have to pay tax to something i have contributed to. host: help people understand how farmers fall into this estate tax? how i
of my health-care consumption. it will make it more costly and i will start shopping for health care. that will create more transparency and get the growth in health-care costs down. we do not know what is gone to work, but there are some interesting -- what is going to work, but there are some interesting new programs that have potential. we should see how those worked out before we engage in some very significant structural changes. like a voucher program. we may have to go down that path, but it is much too premature to do that. we should see how these developments work. up, if temporarily going over the cliff is necessary to achieving a good agreement, lawmakers should not hesitate to do so >" how long do think we could stay over the cliff without doing significant damage to the economy? >> i think you could go into early february. by early february, it looks like you are not coming to a deal and investors began to discount the likelihood you're not coming to a deal, you will see stock prices decline, the bond market reacted. by mid-february, it would be doing a lot of damage. by
there is a crisis, a flu outbreak, or a healthcare associated outbreak, or an environmental threat, where increase in injury or illness would obviously be compromised. host: is a research that goes first? guest: absolutely. that is what we do, and research will get effected. projects with the universal foods vaccine project will get delayed. try to develop a vaccine for hiv/aids. you have a bright, young researchers, and they're in danger of not getting funded. when you do not find them, they will not just continue to go along, they will dropped out of the system. we are concerned about losing a generation of the brightest young researchers. the united states of america has been fortunate that we are the leaders when it comes to biomedical research. we do not want to lose that, and that will happen if people do not get funded. that is the reason me, myself, and dr. frieden and others are concerned that this gets resolved. host: have you had a chance to talk directly to the white house about this? guest: we are definitely in discussion with the department of health and human services, undersecretar
control -- a health-care plan with the same tax benefit if you buy it for yourself or if an employer buys it for you. host: the analysis of david hocking. our question is, what do you think the president impose a number one priority should be a dangerous account term. this is from our twitter page. next is austin from illinois on the republican line. caller: i think it marker rubio is correct in his statement on just trying to get it going. here is my plan. my plan is to get health care -- the health-care committee to make sure businesses are not ripping off people. i do not think the answer is to just give people health care. not just to signify giving health care away but actually have people are at. host: we will go to pam and joining us from idaho. caller: i would like to respond to the congressional gridlock. i think what obama needs to do is to keep his campaign machine active it for the 2014 elections to get rid of the tea party arm and to eliminate mitch mcconnell. if everybody would pay attention and watch c-span it would realize who is causing a lot of this problem. we are down
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
of the healthcare law. they will see the top rates a bump of 3.8% come january 1. that seems unlikely to be changed as part of the fiscal cliff negotiations. you'll still see that surtax on top of that. host: this from twitter. guest: i leave that as it is. host: is that how much it could go up? guest: yes. host: currently it is 35%. go ahead, mark. caller: the previous caller mentioned capital gains -- the recent point about the medicare surcharge to pay for the affordable care act. if he thought it could be a solution to kill both of those birds with one stone. guest: i'm not a health-care expert. host: no problem. we have this from twitter. guest: i believe that is the case. tom in california, go ahead. caller: i have several issues with the estate tax. i am a farmer if it comes back to the normal 1 million exemptions. we work together to build this estate. it wasn't just my parents but it is in my parents' name. i have to pay tax to something i have contributed to. host: help people understand how farmers fall into this estate tax? how is it your estate is worth more than $1 million? caller: we
and the provisions of simpson-bowles. and health-care simpson-bowles would maintain the obamacare medicare cost savings, establish malpractice reforms, explain all that for us. guest: there are a number of provisions in the reform plan that you actually provide some cost constraint to was a very -- constraints which are very important. this increases the purchasing power of individuals. it helps what individual spends on health care. they have a number of medicare changes that were used to help in both pain for the expansion of coverage under obamacare as well as proposals. one of the most of for a thing they propose is a global budget on health care. should help care rise, you basically have a situation where they would be read quired -- required to come back and make changes to what the government is spending on health care in order to drive those costs down. host: independent caller. caller: thank you for taking my call. my question is this. it is seems to me that both the left in the right made up this term is " good to scare everybody. and to make it clear that we cannot do this. it seems
.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is "unaccountable." saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. "washington journal" continues. host: we have been focusing on different parts of the fiscal cliff discussion. today we're looking at tax extenders for businesses and individuals. joining us is sam goldfarb, a tax writer for cq roll call. what our tax extenders? guest: they are temporary tax breaks. some people are concerned the entire tax code is turning into a big tax extender. they are considered to be a small provision and targeted at specific types of businesses. host: why are they temporary? guest: a lot of people say they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. it is easier to pass when they are temporary. they keep on being extended and extended. host: we will look at some of these. these are some of the tax extenders and the cost of continuing the tax breaks through 2013. host: some of those are really specific. guest: that is the idea. they have become a case study in what some people th
provide. and that's why i'm so grateful that we have the greatest medical healthcare system in the world, right here. and the strength of our system lies in you, and people like you. thousands of dedicated professionals who are committed to caring for our sick and for our injured. it lies with each of you. this, as i have said before, is a place where miracles happen, and you are the miracle workers. today, i want to thank you, along with the entire military medical community, for the exceptional care, the exceptional support you provide our service members, for these men and women in uniform, for their families, and for our military retirees. you give them a second chance at life. this community is particularly close to my heart. my wife was trained as a nurse, and one of our three sons is a cardiologist. for those of you that haven't had a wife as a nurse, you don't know what the hell it's all about. because there isn't a damn thing i can do without her being right there, and watching everything you do, and watching everything that our sons did, you know? it was incredible. their exper
revenues come in from within the health-care system? that is on the table. i am not keen on increasing the age on medicare. we have gone to a really big debate about finding a way to have all americans have health insurance. that is taking a group of americans and figure out how they afford health coverage. that shifts the cost of subsidies and they go into the exchange and make it more expensive for younger people because the older court is in that group. -- cohort is in that group for medicare, these are the least expensive singers we have. the most expensive seniors are much older. you have to look exactly at the consequences and whether that is cost-savings for government and families? >> the president had a firm statement this week to the business roundtable about the debt ceiling where he said, i will not play that game. he will not negotiate for conditions on raising the debt ceiling. how will that work? unless it is part of the agreement. does that need to be a part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff? >> who is gaining this? what will the deal be? it is not a game nor i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)